Posted by: powellpjc | June 17, 2009

Letting Go

 

After a pleasant 10 hour motor down the Columbia River we made Astoria, a funky sea town on the Oregon coast, about 10 miles from the great water.

The Columbia River is spanned by a spectacular bridge, under which we motored.

The Astoria bridge to Cape Disappointment. Hard times for someone.

The Astoria bridge to Cape Disappointment. Hard times for someone.

Lots of marine activity here including sport fishing. They were catching salmon (not many) and sturgeon (quite a few). The sturgeon are fresh/saltwater and look to be about 20 pounds or so.

A sturgeon hoisted by a guy who wanted to show off his pipes.

A sturgeon hoisted by a guy who wanted to show off his pipes.

Did some last minute shopping today at Englund Marine. Met Connie there. Connie sailed across the Pacific 18 years ago in a 45 footer by herself. Her father was a commercial fisherman so Connie showed me the way when it came to fishing gear. I have 2 great rods hanging on my salon ceiling but I have no idea how to use them. Now I have a vague idea.

I bought hand lines, tuna clones, rabbits, leaders, sparklers and all manner of related fish shit. The difference between real fisherman and me is that fishermen think like fish. I will trail a line behind the boat and if something commits hari-kari on the end of it he’s mine. As Connie says, ‘practice F&R fishing’. For those of us who don’t know what it means—filet and release.

I topped up the fuel tank here, the water tank and the jerry cans I’ve purchased. Two 5 galloners for water and 2 for diesel. I store the fuel on deck in the yellow jerry cans and the water down below. More than enough is quite sufficient.

I stopped by the mariners memorial today to pay my respects. The sea-faring life takes its toll. The memorial was well-kept and was situated on the river bank with a beautiful view of the mighty Columbia river.

Seamen and their poetry.

Seamen and their poetry.

The local knowledge is to leave early on a flood tide to mitigate the effect of the outrushing river current at the river mouth (bar). Than means I will let go at 3 a.m. to make the bar about 5:00. After that spell of motoring it will be ‘see how the mainsail sets’.

If you want to follow my pilgrim’s progress, go to the website:

http://www.marinetraffic.com/ais/

There you can click on my transmission signal with my AIS—‘Automatic Identification System’. This is some electronic wizardry that allows me to transmit my position (when I have the device on) to the rest of the world. I can also see all commercial traffic and determine whether there may be collision issues. I won’t have the thing on all day because of power drain but I will turn it on each evening at 6 p.m. PST. Or I will try to remember to.

If you’re looking for me look offshore on the west coast of Oregon/California, about 50-200 miles offshore. I will be catching tuna.

 

Even the wind vane is ready to go. I took off the mainsail cover after I took this pic. Now we're ready.

Even the wind vane is ready to go. I took off the mainsail cover after I took this pic. Now we're ready.

See youse in San Diego.

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Responses

  1. Lookin’ good——–love that dodger!!!!!!!!
    TW

  2. Peter
    I tried the marine traffic locater but could not find you?

  3. OMG….good luck and I am envious

  4. Charlie called to the bar yesterday
    It was a very proud day.
    enjoy seviche if you catch a fish

  5. Charlie called to the bar on Friday.Celebrations
    Try seviche if you catch a fish-no cooking required
    Elaine


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